Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Degenerative Arthritis of the Knee)

Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Degenerative Arthritis of the Knee)

What are the symptoms and treatments of Knee Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Degenerative Arthritis of the Knee)

While age is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis of the knee, young people can get it, too. For some individuals, it may be hereditary. For others, osteoarthritis of the knee can result from injury or infection or even from being overweight. Here are answers to your questions about knee osteoarthritis, including how it’s treated and what you can do at home to ease the pain.

What Is Osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis, commonly known as wear-and-tear arthritis, is a condition in which the natural cushioning between joints — cartilage — wears away. When this happens, the bones of the joints rub more closely against one another with less of the shock-absorbing benefits of cartilage. The rubbing results in pain, swelling, stiffness, decreased ability to move and, sometimes, the formation of bone spurs.

Who Gets Osteoarthritis of the Knee?

Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. While it can occur even in young people, the chance of developing osteoarthritis rises after age 45.

What Causes Knee Osteoarthritis?

The most common cause of osteoarthritis of the knee is age. Almost everyone will eventually develop some degree of osteoarthritis. However, several factors increase the risk of developing significant arthritis at an earlier age.

Age. The ability of cartilage to heal decreases as a person gets older.

Weight. Weight increases pressure on all the joints, especially the knees. Every pound of weight you gain adds 3 to 4 pounds of extra weight on your knees.

Heredity. This includes genetic mutations that might make a person more likely to develop osteoarthritis of the knee. It may also be due to inherited abnormalities in the shape of the bones that surround the knee joint.

Gender. Women ages 55 and older are more likely than men to develop osteoarthritis of the knee.

Repetitive stress injuries. These are usually a result of the type of job a person has. People with certain occupations that include a lot of activity that can stress the joint, such as kneeling, squatting, or lifting heavy weights (55 pounds or more), are more likely to develop osteoarthritis of the knee because of the constant pressure on the joint.

Athletics. Athletes involved in soccer, tennis, or long-distance running may be at higher risk for developing osteoarthritis of the knee. That means athletes should take precautions to avoid injury. However, it’s important to note that regular moderate exercise strengthens joints and can decrease the risk of osteoarthritis. In fact, weak muscles around the knee can lead to osteoarthritis.

Other illnesses. People with rheumatoid arthritis, the second most common type of arthritis, are also more likely to develop osteoarthritis. People with certain metabolic disorders, such as iron overload or excess growth hormone, also run a higher risk of osteoarthritis.

What Are the Symptoms of Knee Osteoarthritis?

Symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee may include:

Pain that increases when you are active, but gets a little better with rest

swelling

Feeling of warmth in the joint

Stiffness in the knee, especially in the morning or when you have been sitting for a while

Decrease in mobility of the knee, making it difficult to get in and out of chairs or cars, use the stairs, or walk

Creaking, crackly sound that is heard when the knee moves

How Is Osteoarthritis of the Knee Treated?

The primary goals of treating osteoarthritis of the knee are to relieve the pain and return mobility. The treatment plan will typically include a combination of the following:

Physiotherapy

Electric Dry Needling

Acupuncture.

Exercise. Strengthening the muscles around the knee makes the joint more stable and decreases pain. Stretching exercises help keep the knee joint mobile and flexible.

Pain relief and solid recovery without pain medications and expensive medical bills. Hip and knee pain can keep you from the activities you love, as well as make routine tasks difficult. But there are many ways to get you moving again pain-free, without surgery.

Interested in learning more about this treatment- feel free to reach out at don@donkellypainrelief.com or you can give me a ring 089 273 4307

My treatment plan is the result of my experience and knowledge in treating chronic pains and injuries over the last 20 years. This is the holistic plan to guarantee pain relief, prevent recurring pains, and faster recovery. 

EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT

PHYSIOTHERAPY PLAN BASED ON MY ASSESSMENT

HOMECARE EXERCISE/PLAN

ACUPUNCTURE

EXERCISE PROGRAMME

DRY CUPPING/DRY NEEDLING

MASSAGE

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